Internship in Peru

Peru has a lot to offer for the more adventurous souls who want to move rapidly and experience ancients heights in the Andes. Incidentally also enticing travellers are fresh fish salads, handmade sweaters and cuddly alpacas on a journey into the popular Latino country. But staying in Peru becomes even more worth it when these attractions are only secondary reasons for the long journey and an internship in Peru is your ultimate goal.

 

 

Though the economy has been been booming the last years in Peru, a lot of its people still suffer from poverty. Therefore we especially recommend internships in the social work sector, as that means you can improve your Spanish language and professional skills and at the same time can get socially committed in Peru.

 

Internship programs in Peru

The best opportunities are in the social area? Not only ...

While volunteering programs in Peru offer more and more opportunities to sustainably engage in Peru for society, culture and nature, a professional industry based internship seems to be an odd choice. Even where international workers are present, they are also used as a means to support the local community. This is a matter of priority in the social field. The relatively good economic situation hasn’t brought sufficient wealth to large parts of the population. An internship as an English teacher or in the medical field is useful for the community and will broaden your horizons.

Blessed with a rich appearance of natural resources, the mining industry is, in addition to tourism, one of the largest areas of work for locals. But what about other popular internships in engineering, marketing, or in the IT fields? Internships can be found even in small and medium sized companies - especially if the international applicant can already speak a certain level of Spanish.

What to expect from a 6-months internship in Peru? Thomas, our former intern tells us more about his technology internship and reveals some important do's and don'ts of living in Cuzco.

 

What to expect from an internship in Peru

In focus: working in a Spanish-speaking environment

Those who are targeting an internship in South America, must know that their own English skills won’t necessarily improve. However, many candidates start the journey with a small repertoire of Spanish vocabulary and through facing obstacles from time to time use English for communication. During the internship, you should – in spite of initial shyness – always try to converse in Spanish with colleagues. Former interns in Peru confirm that this particular everyday interaction catapulted their language level to a higher level.

Explore Peru

During an internship in Cusco there are many day tours offering trips in and around Cusco. With bus rides at night you can travel long distances in a short time. Attractions such as Lake Titicaca or Machu Picchu may soon be checked off  your "To Do" list. For the more adrenaline junkies, there is 

  • mountain biking,
  • quad biking,
  • rafting,
  • zip-lining,
  • bungee jumping,
  • or paragliding to choose from.

Take full advantage of the weekends, you can even leave the borders of Peru and explore Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. Friday night take the bus Monday morning come back just in time for work, which in Peru is not a problem.

Visa made easy

Unlike other popular internship countries in North America, the visa application for South American countries doesn’t face the same hurdles. Honestly, there aren’t really any, because for an internship of less than 183 days you do not need to apply for a visa in advance. The tourist visa you just get on arrival. Although this is only valid for 90 days, it can be "renewed" by an overnight stay in one of the neighboring countries and is then extended as you re-enter Peru.

Are you the host family or community living type?

How comfortable you feel in your living quarters, especially in a developing country such as Peru, has a huge impact on the overall impression of your stay abroad. No matter whether you prefer a more cozy atmosphere in a family or maybe you want to enjoy the student life in a flat - Peru has both to offer and both come recommended! Living with a host family brings in linguistic and culinary benefits - first-hand cultural experience, each and every day. If you opt for living in a shared house, then you will live together with other international like-minded people. Cooking together, going out and game nights are on the agenda.