With helping hands to the Cape of Good Hope

Day by day Rebekka does full justice to Cape Town’s capital: she gives hope to its people. For more than 5 months Rebekka is supporting children, youth and women, who she actually has just met. Moreover, she gets involved leaving the boundaries of her volunteer project. In her blog she reports from her extra-ordinary experiences in Cape Town, filled with both joy and sorrow.

„A girl who has been infected with HIV and has been drug addicted for a long time, asked us, if we could get her something to wear. I remember clearly, when I met her the first time. She was limp and scraggy and you could read the strains she must have faced in the last few years from her tiny and fragile body.”

Together with her host organization Rebekka gives a helping hand to the people living in the townships of Cape Town. They add effective and sustainable support wherever it is needed the most. In her private blog she shares stories of little pleasures, about wonders, but also about sorrow and pain. We want to share one of her stories, both to honor her incredible efforts and to inspire you: Heroes don’t always have shiny armors

Good deeds day

Blog entry from Rebekka from July 7th 2014

Today definitely was a good deeds day for Lydia and me. It already started in the train to Tygerberg. Usually, many homeless and street kids enter the train and ask passengers for food. My host mom prepared some energy packages containing yummy fruit, chocolate of nut bars, to be donated to the homeless. So it was my task that special morning to give them.

Having arrived at Tygerberg, we continued in the direction to Blikkisdorp, a small township close to Cape Town, to give the glasses, I collected in Germany. As expected, they were more than happy to receive this kind of donation as glasses are quite expensive and not affordable for people living in townships. They immediately tried the glasses and figured out, which prescription power of the glasses is appropriate. They don’t even have the possibility to visit a doctor specialized in eyes to find out if they would need glasses. And even if they could go, most of the people cannot even afford to get to the doctor of the hospital, as it is too fas. Therefore, I would like to say thanks to my cousin, who made all of this possible!

So, as it is supposed to be a good deeds day, Lydia and I went on a small shopping trip. A girl who has been infected with HIV and has been drug addicted for a long time, asked us, if we could get her something to wear. I remember clearly, when I met her the first time. She was limp and scraggy and you could read the strains she must have faced in the last few years from her tiny and fragile body. She usually was as quiet as a mouse, sitting in her wheel chair, gazing in abstraction. Her parents said she would probably die the next days.

It must have been weeks since she hasn’t taken her medications and stopped eating. Her mother tried her best, but she didn’t have the power anymore, either. Any special treatment for the girl would have been unaffordable. 

Then, out of the sudden, everything changed. The girl continued taking her medications and started eating again. When we saw here this special day, she looked at us with her bright eyes and seemed to be a different person. She didn’t even need her wheel chair anymore, even though she was still a bit groggy. But she made progress every day. It seemed to be wonder, seeing her like this after years of struggling with her HIV infection.

Back to our story: we decided to make her wish come true and went in a shopping mall to get her a brand new jogging suit in pink and blue. She was to thankful and gave us a big hug.

It was a great feeling to see her beautiful smile again.